You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

speed

The efficacy and likelihood that a “treatment” will cure a “condition” are measured with five, nine-point questions.  The particular treatment and condition are specified in the items.

A customer’s attitude regarding a particular online retailer’s tendency to deliver products in an acceptable period of time is measured using three, five-point Likert-type items.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s attitude regarding the ease and speed with which he/she is able to purchase products at a particular retailer.  The scale is general in the sense that the statements are amenable for use with either physical stores or those online.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's ability to quickly generate mental images as depicted in an advertisement he/she has just been exposed to.

The extent to which shopping websites are viewed as loading fast and responding quickly to a shopper's actions is measured with three statements.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping sites in general.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular piece of technology allows a business activity to be conducted quickly is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

The perceived time frame for some event is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular website is the simple to use and fast.

The complexity of a certain task is measured in this scale with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The task that was evaluated in the study by Sprott, Czellar, and Spangenberg (2009) was a survey (how complicated it was to answer).

This three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital's staff provided prompt attention and service during the admissions process.