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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

speed

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the belief that a branded mobile phone application responds quickly to one’s input.

A customer’s attitude regarding a particular online retailer’s tendency to deliver products in an acceptable period of time is measured using three, five-point Likert-type items.

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s attitude regarding the ease and speed with which he/she is able to purchase products at a particular retailer.  The scale is general in the sense that the statements are amenable for use with either physical stores or those online.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's ability to quickly generate mental images as depicted in an advertisement he/she has just been exposed to.

The extent to which shopping websites are viewed as loading fast and responding quickly to a shopper's actions is measured with three statements.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping sites in general.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular piece of technology allows a business activity to be conducted quickly is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

The perceived time frame for some event is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular website is the simple to use and fast.

The complexity of a certain task is measured in this scale with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The task that was evaluated in the study by Sprott, Czellar, and Spangenberg (2009) was a survey (how complicated it was to answer).