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spiritual

Five, six-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person describes his/her faith (unspecified) as providing meaning to life and affecting aspects of how he/she lives. 

With three, seven-point items, the scale is intended to measure how much a person engages in particular religious activities: praying, reading scripture, and attending services.

The scale measures a consumer’s belief in personal reincarnation and that the universe itself is in a continual cycle.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks about and is disturbed by thoughts regarding his/her death.  The scale was called existential insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009) and fear of one's own death by the originator (Wittkowski 2001).

The degree to which a person views fate as a powerful force that influences events and outcomes is measured in this scale using six, ten-point Likert-type items.  Fate has a sense of predestination while luck is more transient.  Despite the distinction, the scale seems to capture aspects of both.

The value placed by a person on the welfare of those people with whom one is in frequent personal contact is measured using nine, nine-point statements.