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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

sponsor

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree which a person believes the reason a brand sponsors something, such as a team, event, or charity, is because it is something that is expected by constituents, e.g., employees, customers, the community at large.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the novelty and interestingness of a sponsorship being promoted in an advertisement by a sponsoring entity for something such as an event, an organization, or a cause.

The degree to which a sponsoring entity and a sponsee are viewed as fitting together well is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.  (A sponsee is the entity being sponsored, such as an event, an organization, or a cause.)

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure a person’s belief that a specified entity (person, cause, organization) being sponsored for some unstated reason is similar in its goals and image to the specified sponsor.

Four Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a parent holds positive beliefs about "advergames" made for children.  (Advergames are custom-made for a good or service in order to entertain potential consumers as well as promote the brand.)

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure how genuinely a person's believes an organization cares about a charitable cause.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the scale is most suited to charities than help fund research of some sort.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how one's attitude about an organization is affected by learning it is sponsoring a certain event or cause.  It was referred to as effect on sponsor by Olson and Thjømøe (2011).

Six, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a person believes a particular organization got involved with a certain charitable cause because of a sincere desire to help others.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the extent to which a person believes a party that has evaluated and endorsed a new product is viewed favorably by others. The measure was referred to as superordinate group influence by Fisher and Price (1992).

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person views an organization as engaging in an activity out of self interest rather than for the public's interests. As used by Simmons and Becker-Olsen (2006), the scale compared what people thought about a nonprofit cause vs. its corporate sponsor announcing the relationship between the two.