You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

sponsor

This set of scales use bi-polar adjectives designed to capture a consumer's overall evaluation of a specified advertiser. As used by Rifon et al. (2004), the scale measured attitude toward the sponsor of a website.

These three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that a party is engaging in a behavior primarily for its own benefit, such as to make a profit. 

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to assess how well two products are viewed as going together, particularly in their usage.

The scale uses three statements to assess a person's attitude about a website, with the emphasis being on familiarity with the company that owns the site and the quality of what it does. The scale was called brand strength by Bart et al. (2005).

Four sets of bi-polar adjectives are used to assess a person's opinion of the actor or spokesperson featured in an advertisement with an emphasis on how likeable the person appears to be.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type statements intended to assess a person's belief that a company cares about its customers, particularly in some specific aspect of their lives, e.g., health.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the extent to which a person thinks that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is done to benefit itself rather than being motivated by altruism. The scale was called anti-altruism by Dean (2002).

The four item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is generous and unselfish.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring the subjective likelihood that if a certain company supported a particular event then it would improve the chances that a consumer would attend to and remember the sponsor's promotion. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring how likely a particular company is viewed as being a sponsor of a variety of major sporting events. "Ubiquity" implies that the sponsor seems to be everywhere, visibly associated with lots of top sporting events.