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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

sports

The extent to which a person expresses his/her identity by watching a particular event is measured with three items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person was not certain of an event's ending when it was occurring and was interested to find out what would happen.  The items seem to be amenable for use with a TV program, an advertisement, an election, or a variety of other things as well.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how one's attitude about an organization is affected by learning it is sponsoring a certain event or cause.  It was referred to as effect on sponsor by Olson and Thjømøe (2011).

The three-item, five-point scale measures the degree to which a person describes him/herself as being competitive and as having a strong desire to win.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring the subjective likelihood that if a certain company supported a particular event then it would improve the chances that a consumer would attend to and remember the sponsor's promotion. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring how likely a particular company is viewed as being a sponsor of a variety of major sporting events. "Ubiquity" implies that the sponsor seems to be everywhere, visibly associated with lots of top sporting events.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person's attitude about a company's reasons for sponsoring an event, the emphasis being on the opinion that the sponsor genuinely has the "best interest" of the event in mind.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring the likelihood that if a certain company supported a particular event then it would improve the chances that a consumer would buy the sponsor's products. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person's interest in some specific event and its importance to him/her. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

The likelihood that a person will use the web in the future to access a wide range of information and light entertainment-type services such as news, sports, movie reviews, and weather is measured using eight, five-point items.