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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

sports

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items intended to measure a person's general liking of activities that could enhance one's social status.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person considers the normal price charged for a particular good, service, or activity make the deal a good value.

Eight scenarios with seven-point response scales are used to assess the way a consumer believes a specified health club would resolve potential service problems.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person evaluates the tangible aspects of an object such as a structure to be of high quality.  The object examined by Wakefield and Barnes (1996) was a stadium.

The scale seems to measure a person's overall interest in soccer but most particularly gauges the degree to which a person was involved in watching a particular game on television.  The measure is composed of eight, seven-point items with seven of the items being of the Likert-type.

The degree to which a person indicates being a fan of some form of entertainment, particularly a sports team, is measured in this scale by three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This is a four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's interest in watching, talking about, reading about, and attending sporting events, although not necessarily personally participating in sports. A five-item version of the scale was used by Dickerson and Gentry (1983).

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's expressed level of personal involvement in sports activities, not just being a spectator. It was referred to as sports enthusiast by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and physical fitness by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).