You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

stability

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure a person's belief in either the stability of body type (entity theory) or their ability to change basic body characteristics (incremental theory).  To be clear, beliefs about the nature of human bodies in general are measured by this scale rather than what people think about a particular person’s body.

The extent to which a person believes in one’s ability to change the self is measured with four, six-point Likert-type items.

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person values security for self and family is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using eight uni-polar adjectives, this scale is intended to measure the theorized dimension of personality having to do with the degree to which a person has a tendency to seek efficiency and structure.

The amount of perceived instability a person has experienced in his/her life during a certain period of time is measured in this scale using five, nine-point Likert-type items.

The seriousness of a situation is measured in this scale using five, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure the degree to which a customer expects the cause of a service failure to persist over time. The scale was called attributions of stability by Hess, Ganesan, and Klein (2003).

The scale is composed of seven, nine-point statements that attempt to assess the value a person places on the safety and stability of individual and group relationships.