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status

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items intended to measure a person's general liking of activities that could enhance one's social status.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate a person's excessive concern for personal accomplishments and need for others to acknowledge his or her success.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate a person's positive, and possibly inflated, view of his or her own accomplishments, particularly as it relates to others' opinions of his or her success.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate a person's sense of being special and having very high (and possibly exaggerated) self-esteem.

Five Likert-type statements are used to measure the tendency to purchase goods and services for the social prestige they give to their users. The construct has been defined by its authors as "the motivational process by which individuals strive to improve their social standing through the conspicuous consumption of consumer products that confer and symbolize status both for the individual and the surrounding others" (Eastman, Goldsmith, and Flynn 1997, p. 8).

Ten, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate the degree to which a person values ambition and social status as appropriate life goals.

A nine-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's belief that buying the most expensive brands is a positive experience for him or her and that it impresses others. Lichtenstein, Ridgway, and Netemeyer (1993) referred to the scale as prestige sensitivity whereas Netemeyer, Burton, and Lichtenstein (1995) called it price-based prestige sensitivity and only used six of the nine items.

A 13-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's attitude about a store, especially those with salespeople.