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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

strategy

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person blames a specific entity (store, company, organization) and its strategies for him/her terminating the relationship between them.

How much change a person believes there to be in the market for a particular product category in terms of the products available, the promotion conducted, and consumer preferences is measured using four, seven-point items.

With six, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the apparent regulatory orientation of a charitable organization, ranging from a promotion focus to a prevention focus.

The degree to which a person believes that a certain brand-related marketing strategy is commonly used among competitors in a certain product category is measured with five, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with a variety of brand-related strategies.

A person's opinion of a company's pricing strategy is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person views a company as supporting a cause because it will help attract and keep more customers as well as help it to be more profitable.

This seven item with a seven-point response format is intended to measure a person's expressed intention to deal with a stressful situation by taking direct action to solve the problem in an objective manner.

The three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree of importance a person believes should be placed on an advertising agency's ability to provide assistance in developing business strategy when making a choice among agencies. As written, the scale does not measure a person's attitude toward a specific agency's ability but rather the role this criterion should play in general when making a selection among agencies.