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strength

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree to which a person indicates having a social connection with a particular person in the past.

The scale uses three, five-point unipolar items to measure how much a person describes someone as having traits stereotypically associated with males.

The degree to which a person is confident that his/her attitude toward an object is correct is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

The extent to which a person reports feeling powerful at a particular point in time is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.  To be clear, this is a measure of a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic.

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a person believes that a message was persuasive and changed what he/she thought about a topic.

The importance of a person’s attitude about a particular object or topic and the certainty of his/her attitude is measured with five, seven-point items.

How graphic and intense a stimulus is perceived to be is measured in this scale with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she has the motivation and the ability to control and achieve desired outcomes.  The scale is general in the sense that it can be used in a wide variety of contexts.