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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

stress

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes that employees of a business engaged in behaviors that infringed on one’s space and activities in the establishment.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much a person has been burdened by something that has happened to the point that it depletes his/her ability to deal with it.

The extent to which a person feels awkward in a certain social context is measured in this scale with three uni-polar items.

With six, five-point, uni-polar items, the scale measures feelings of stress and discomfort one has experienced in some context.

The scale uses three, nine-point uni-polar terms to measure how much a person feels under pressure and worried about something.  The scale is "general" in the sense that the three items composing the scale are not specific to any particular object or event and can be paired with properly written instructions for any number of contexts.

The degree to which a person is able to control his/her negative emotions in order to facilitate proper functioning is measured in this scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale was called management of negative emotions by Taute, McQuitty, and Sautter (2011).