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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

structure

With eight, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much at a particular moment in time one’s motivation is to be around people and situations in which he/she has high certainty of what to expect.

The degree to which a person feels uneasy when society appears to be changing rapidly is measured with three, seven-point items.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

The ease with which a person reports being able to get around a website and find what is wanted is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The seriousness of a situation is measured in this scale using five, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

Four, five-point semantic-differentials are used to measure a person's attitude about the way an advertisement is visually presented. The study by Burns and Lutz (2006) focused on ad formats that are used online, e.g., banners, pop-ups, skyscrapers, interstitials.

The uni-polar scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person considers a website to lack clear structure and ease of use. It is composed of four terms and utilizes a five-point response format.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person evaluates the tangible aspects of an object such as a structure to be of high quality.  The object examined by Wakefield and Barnes (1996) was a stadium.