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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

structure

With eight, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much at a particular moment in time one’s motivation is to be around people and situations in which he/she has high certainty of what to expect.

The degree to which a person feels uneasy when society appears to be changing rapidly is measured with three, seven-point items.

The five item, nine-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that an advertisement uses a story-like format that communicates information about critical structural components such as who, what, where, and why. 

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

The ease with which a person reports being able to get around a website and find what is wanted is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The seriousness of a situation is measured in this scale using five, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

Four, five-point semantic-differentials are used to measure a person's attitude about the way an advertisement is visually presented. The study by Burns and Lutz (2006) focused on ad formats that are used online, e.g., banners, pop-ups, skyscrapers, interstitials.

The uni-polar scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person considers a website to lack clear structure and ease of use. It is composed of four terms and utilizes a five-point response format.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person evaluates the tangible aspects of an object such as a structure to be of high quality.  The object examined by Wakefield and Barnes (1996) was a stadium.