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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

students

Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which a person believes he/she is performing well so far in a class and meeting his/her grade expectations.

How well a person believes he/she performed on a particular test and met his/her expectations is measured with five, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person was daydreaming or thinking about other things during a particular task.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular task in which he/she has participated was fun and interesting.

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how smart a person is subjectively judged to be.  The emphasis is on learning and grades, thus, is most suited for use with students.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person is satisfied with the institution where he/she received some formal education.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular university needs financial support from its alumni.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are purported to measure the degree to which a person subordinates individual goals to those of the group, classmates in particular. The group (rather than the individual) is viewed as the basic unit of survival.

This five-item, six-point scale is used to measure the enduring and intrinsic (rather than situational) relevance of college to a person. The object in the Arora (1982) study was a university and he developed and tested Stapel, Likert, and semantic differential versions of the scale.

Four, six-point statement are used to measure the importance of several characteristics of a school, college, or university to a person. The object in the Arora (1982) study was a university and he developed Stapel, Likert, and semantic differential versions of the scale.