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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

superiority

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how well made a particular company’s products are believed to be.

Using three questions, this scale measures how much a person believes that at a particular point in time he/she had power over other people.

The extent to which a person reports feeling powerful at a particular point in time is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.  To be clear, this is a measure of a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic.

The degree to which a patron believes a certain place serves his/her goals better than the available alternatives is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a person’s unease and displeasure that a group he/she belongs to is inferior to other such groups and is not performing as well.  The criteria on which the groups are being compared are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire. 

The scale measures a person’s eagerness for his/her group to compete against other such groups and win.  The way the groups would compete and how superiority would be judged are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire.  Six, seven-point items compose the scale.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that the service provided by a company is high quality, with no reference to any specific type of business or aspect of service quality.

A person’s feeling of uniqueness and status (though not necessarily superiority) is measured in the scale with three, nine-point items.

Three statements are used to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of products sharing a brand name are of high quality.