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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

superiority

A person’s feeling of uniqueness and status (though not necessarily superiority) is measured in the scale with three, nine-point items.

Three statements are used to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of products sharing a brand name are of high quality.

The leadership ability of an athlete with his/her team as well as his/her relative standing with other athletes in the sport is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three items are used to measure how much a consumer believes that a brand extension will be of better quality than most other brands.  The statements are phrased somewhat hypothetically because, as used by Sichtmann and Diamantopoulos (2013), the extensions were fictitious but the brands themselves were real and familiar.

The three-item, five-point scale measures the degree to which a person feels that engaging in one of two behaviors would be a signal of his/her status and superiority to others.

The extent to which a person believes that others view him/her as socially inferior is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's feeling of superiority over someone else in particular because of something the former (the respondent) has received is measured with three statements.

The degree to which a person believes that a brand has been made by a trustworthy company, is high quality, and is better than the competition is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes so-called "green products" are of high-quality and better than those that are not considered to be "green."

Four, ten point, semantic differentials are used to measure how positively or negatively a person feels about him- or her-self.