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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

surprise

How much a person experiences positive feelings due to an unexpected event involving products received from a company is measured with four, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person experiences positive feelings resulting from an unexpected viewing of a movie trailer is measured with four, seven-point items.

Using three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures the extent to which a person experiences positive feelings due to unexpectedly seeing a particular painting.

Composed of four, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a person experiences positive feelings due to hearing a particular song unexpectedly. 

The degree to which a person has an emotional response to a stimulus which results from feelings of surprise and joy is measured with five, seven-point items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person expresses surprise in the behavior of the other party of a relationship in a particular situation.  The circumstances surrounding the event in which the behavior occurred are not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

How a customer believes an actual experience compares to what he/she expected it to be is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person believes a particular advertisement is atypical and unexpected.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure not only how excited a person is about a certain advertisement but also the probability he/she will show the ad to someone else.

This is a three-item, five-point scale assessing a person's experience with the surprise-related emotion. The directions and response scale can be worded so as to measure the intensity of the emotional state at the present time or they can be adjusted to measure the frequency with which a person has experienced the emotion during some specified time period. One-word items were used in the study by Westbrook and Oliver (1991) and phrases based on those same items were used by Allen, Machleit, and Kleine (1992).