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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

task

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale is used to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by one of two trait-like “modes” of attention: focus on the immediate environment (experiencing) or stimuli-independent thought (mind wandering).

During a particular task, how much a person’s mind was wandering and thinking about other things is measured with three, five-point items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures the time and effort a consumer reports spending to choose between options within a product category that were available in a store.

The degree to which a person reports having to force him/herself to continue engaging in an arithmetically-intensive task is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how much a person liked a task and thought it was interesting.  Two versions have been used, one with seven items and another with four.

How easy and enjoyable a person believes a task to be is measured with three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how easily a shopper is able to use the necessary math to compute a discount offered by a retailer.  The scale makes sense to use when a discount is not explicit but rather must be calculated by the consumer by using the information provided, e.g., regular price and sale price.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person's belief in being able to personally solve a problem that would otherwise require the company's help to fix.  The scale items seem to be amenable for use with a variety of problems a customer might experience, e.g., with self-service technology, with a product, with a website.