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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

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The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale is used to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by one of two trait-like “modes” of attention: focus on the immediate environment (experiencing) or stimuli-independent thought (mind wandering).

During a particular task, how much a person’s mind was wandering and thinking about other things is measured with three, five-point items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures the time and effort a consumer reports spending to choose between options within a product category that were available in a store.

The degree to which a person reports having to force him/herself to continue engaging in an arithmetically-intensive task is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how much a person liked a task and thought it was interesting.  Two versions have been used, one with seven items and another with four.

How easy and enjoyable a person believes a task to be is measured with three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how easily a shopper is able to use the necessary math to compute a discount offered by a retailer.  The scale makes sense to use when a discount is not explicit but rather must be calculated by the consumer by using the information provided, e.g., regular price and sale price.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person's belief in being able to personally solve a problem that would otherwise require the company's help to fix.  The scale items seem to be amenable for use with a variety of problems a customer might experience, e.g., with self-service technology, with a product, with a website.