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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

task

The degree to which a participant in an experimental task reports being unable to concentrate and focus is measured with seven, ten-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person actively participated in a particular decision-making process with another person and, afterward, felt accountable for the decision that was made.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular task he/she engaged in strengthened what was personally important in life. 

One’s attitude regarding how much he/she liked a person with whom he/she worked with in a particular joint task and the willingness to work with that person again is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much effort a participant put into a study and how interesting he/she considered it to be is measured with four, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

The pride a person feels after accomplishing a particular task is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

Four, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree of confidence a person has in his/her capability to learn a particular task and competently perform it.

How complex and time-consuming a task is considered to be is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

The degree of difficulty a person expresses in choosing one brand from among several in a product category is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.