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Scale Reviews

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This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how easily a shopper is able to use the necessary math to compute a discount offered by a retailer.  The scale makes sense to use when a discount is not explicit but rather must be calculated by the consumer by using the information provided, e.g., regular price and sale price.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person's belief in being able to personally solve a problem that would otherwise require the company's help to fix.  The scale items seem to be amenable for use with a variety of problems a customer might experience, e.g., with self-service technology, with a product, with a website. 

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person is very sensitive of his/her contextual environment.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state vs. trait measure.

A person's self-confidence in his/her ability to open e-mail messages if so desired is measured using five items. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person thought about his/her friends.  The scale makes most sense to use when the researcher wants to know to what extent respondents thought about friends in a certain context or while engaging in a certain activity.

How easily a person is able to convert an amount of money in an unfamiliar currency to an equivalent amount in a familiar currency is measured in this scale using four, seven-point semantic differentials.

A person' expressed feeling of physical discomfort while performing a certain task is measured in this scale with three statements.

With four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the level of involvement a person reports having when a particular activity was performed.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.