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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

task

A person's self-confidence in his/her ability to open e-mail messages if so desired is measured using five items. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person thought about his/her friends.  The scale makes most sense to use when the researcher wants to know to what extent respondents thought about friends in a certain context or while engaging in a certain activity.

How easily a person is able to convert an amount of money in an unfamiliar currency to an equivalent amount in a familiar currency is measured in this scale using four, seven-point semantic differentials.

A person' expressed feeling of physical discomfort while performing a certain task is measured in this scale with three statements.

With four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the level of involvement a person reports having when a particular activity was performed.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.

The level of distraction a person experiences in a room used for an experiment is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses five items to measure a person's self-confidence in his/her ability to forward e-mail messages to others if the content is considered to have value for them. 

The extent of a person's engagement in a certain activity is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The level of effort and time required to complete a specified task is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.