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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

task

The scale uses five items to measure a person's self-confidence in his/her ability to forward e-mail messages to others if the content is considered to have value for them. 

The extent of a person's engagement in a certain activity is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The level of effort and time required to complete a specified task is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The belief that a choice one is making is self-determined rather than being externally imposed is measured in this scale with five, nine-point Likert-type items. Botti and McGill (2011) referred to the measure as personal causality.

How responsible a person feels with regard to a decision that he/she made is measured in this scale using four, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's evaluation of his/her mental strength at a particular point in time, e.g., while engaged in an experimental task.

The extent to which a person believes he/she will be able to save the necessary funds for some potential future purpose is measured in this three item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

The degree to which a consumer reports having had difficulty making a recent decision, possibly to the point of being confused and overwhelmed, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.