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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

task

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.

A person's preparation for and eagerness to begin a certain task is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The problem a consumer has distinguishing between brands in a product category and choosing one of them is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The complexity of a certain task is measured in this scale with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The task that was evaluated in the study by Sprott, Czellar, and Spangenberg (2009) was a survey (how complicated it was to answer).

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

The extent to which a person expresses the ability to regulate his/her engagement in an activity is measured using four, seven-point items.

The basis on which a person thinks a decision was made is measured in this five-item, seven-point scale. Essentially, the scale attempts to measure the relative roles played by affect and cognition in a particular decision a person has made.

This four-item, seven-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of care used by a respondent when completing a questionnaire so as to provide answers that accurately reflect his/her feelings and opinions.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the level of involvement a subject reports with regard to an experimental exercise that he/she has just engaged in. The exercise studied by Swinyard (1993) was a retail shopping experience.