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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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The extent to which a person believes he/she will be able to save the necessary funds for some potential future purpose is measured in this three item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

The degree to which a consumer reports having had difficulty making a recent decision, possibly to the point of being confused and overwhelmed, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.

A person's preparation for and eagerness to begin a certain task is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The problem a consumer has distinguishing between brands in a product category and choosing one of them is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The complexity of a certain task is measured in this scale with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The task that was evaluated in the study by Sprott, Czellar, and Spangenberg (2009) was a survey (how complicated it was to answer).

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

The extent to which a person expresses the ability to regulate his/her engagement in an activity is measured using four, seven-point items.

The basis on which a person thinks a decision was made is measured in this five-item, seven-point scale. Essentially, the scale attempts to measure the relative roles played by affect and cognition in a particular decision a person has made.