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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

task

The scale is composed of seven-point semantic differentials that are used to measure the degree to which a person was cognitively engaged in a task that involved reading.  As currently stated, the items are most appropriate for use when study participants are expected to carefully read some information about a product.

The scale is composed of three, six-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person expresses having difficulty making a decision. The scale was called perceived ambiguity by Kardes et al. (2007).

Four, nine-point semantic-differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of ability and proficiency a person experienced during a recent creative activity.

The scale is composed of six, nine-point Likert-type items that measure the degree of pleasure a person reports feeling during a recent experience which heavily involved the person's creativity.

This scale has four, nine-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that during a recent experience he/she was free to express his/her creativity.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure how difficult it was for a person to develop a concept of a particular product that was described with aspects of two other products or brands, e.g., a parent name and a sub-brand name. The scale was called difficulty of concept formation by Jo (2007).

Four, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a choice he/she has made was free from coercion or pressure to select a particular option. The scale was called self-determination by Mogilner, Rudnick, and Iyengar (2008).

Three items with a seven-point Likert-type response format are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person reports feeling in control of some object or activity.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person says that his/her mind was focused on the task of browsing a website rather than on something else. The scale was referred to as the attention subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to it here by that term.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a person reports that a lot of thought was given to an advertisement he/she was exposed to and it helped him/her to imagine using the product. The scale was called depth of processing by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008).