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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

taste

How much a person believes that food products that are served warm are usually rich in calories is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how pleasurable and delicious a certain food or beverage is considered to be.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s belief that locally produced foods taste better and are more nutritious than those produced elsewhere.

Five semantic differentials compose the scale and measure facets of a food product’s quality and taste.

How much a person likes a beverage based on the way it looks and tastes is measured with four, seven-point items.

The tastiness of a specified food or beverage is measured in this scale with four, four-point semantic differentials.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

The tastiness of a particular food, with the emphasis on its moistness and juiciness, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.

How well an object (food or beverage) tastes is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.