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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

taste

Five semantic differentials compose the scale and measure facets of a food product’s quality and taste.

How much a person likes a beverage based on the way it looks and tastes is measured with four, seven-point items.

The tastiness and healthiness of a specified food is measured in this scale with four, four-point semantic differentials.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears like it could be used with a wide variety of foods and beverages.

The tastiness of a particular food, with the emphasis on its moistness and juiciness, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.

How well a food tastes is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.

A person's attitude toward eating a particular food is measured with four, seven-point items.  The emphasis of the statements is on how tasty the food is expected to be.

How much a person likes a new food or beverage product and expects it to be successful when it goes on sale is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

One's assessment of something that has been tasted is measured in this scale using three, nine-point items.

Composed of five, seven-point semantic differentials, this scale is intended to measure the desirability of a food to a person and his/her willingness to pay a lot for it.  The items seem to be amenable for use with beverages as well.

The degree to which a patient believes the food served in a particular hospital was delivered when expected and was appetizing is measured with a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale.