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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

technology

This Likert scale has three, five-point items that measure how much a technological application helps a customer shopping at an online store be more effective and, in particular, better evaluate a product.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how easy and understandable a person believes a particular in-store shopping technology would be to use.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because the respondent has only read about the technology.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.

This three item Likert scale with a seven-point response format measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular in-store shopping technology would add value to the shopping experience.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because participants will not actually have used the technology when responding to the scale but merely have read about it.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.

The ten, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale measure the degree of interest a consumer has in knowing about new high-tech products as well as the desire to be among the first to buy them.

The level of importance a consumer places on knowing about and owning new technological products is measured in this six item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

A customer's belief that he/she has the ability to use the new self-service checkout technology at a particular store is measured with three items.

Four items are used to measure a customer's preference to be checked out of a store by an employee rather than using a self-service device.

This three item scale measures a customer's belief that it is not worth changing from the type of checkout he/she has experience with at a store to another form of checkout.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person expresses positive beliefs about the functional aspects of a company's self-service technology (SST), particularly its responsiveness, reliability, and ease of use.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks a company's self-service technology (SST) is interesting and feels good about using it.