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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

technology

How easily a person believes that a certain product can be used or learn to be used is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point statements. Thompson et al. (2005) referred to the scale as product usability.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a good or service is free from effort when being used. Meuter et al. (2005) referred to this scale as complexity because they were studying the five key characteristics thought to influence adoption of innovations (Rogers 2003).

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a good or service is well-suited to his/her needs and lifestyle. Because this is one of the five key characteristics that are thought to influence adoption of innovations (Rogers 2003), this construct is most typically examined with respect to new products rather than mature ones.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type statements to measure a person's belief that companies producing biotech crops have the ability to control whether or not their products are a safety hazard to the public. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as transparency.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that government agencies in the U.S. have clear policies regarding the production of biotech crops. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as rule-based trust.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's belief that companies producing biotech crops are concerned about and committed to following U.S. government regulations. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as intent.

One's subjective degree of control over performance of a particular behavior is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type statements. As viewed by Ajzen (2002), perceived behavioral control is an overarching construct that includes self-efficacy as well as controllability. Nysveen, Pederson and Thorbjørnsen (2005) used the scale with mobile services but it appears to be amenable for use with goods as well.

Thirteen, seven-point bi-polar items are used to measure a person's evaluation of a high technology product or at least a product that could be viewed as having a technology component. Tybout et al. (2005) used the scale with cars.

Four, nine-point statements are used to measure a consumer's opinion of a product and inclination to use it. Given the way the items are currently phrased, the scale makes most sense to use with a new subscription-type service that could be viewed as innovative.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which using a technological device or system is viewed by a person as improving his/her shopping ability.