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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

television

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s usage of two media at the same time to perform one or more tasks.  To be clear, the scale focuses on what a person did in a particular situation rather than his/her tendency over time to multi-task.

How much a person attentively watched a television program and considered it to be fascinating is measured in the scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, five-point items are used in this scale to measure an adolescent’s belief about what his/her parents would say if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with the unacceptable media content and providing rationale in which the perspective of the adolescent is taken seriously.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular program provided him/her with new ideas and other information is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

A person’s attitude about the appropriateness of sex being used in advertising, TV programs, and other media is measured with three items.

Four, four-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person watches, attends, and enjoys a particular sport.

A person’s interest in and frequency of watching a particular sports-related event is measured with three, four-point items.

The extent to which a person expresses his/her identity by watching a particular event is measured with three items.

Four items are used in the scale to measure a person's negative opinion of a branded product shown in a television program.  As currently phrased, the items are meant for a report or news-related program.  However, slight editing of the statements could make them amenable for use in other situations, e.g., game shows, situation comedies, movies, etc.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good source of information about products.