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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

television

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale assesses the degree to which a person expresses enjoyment in watching TV commercials.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good source of information about products.

Four, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent that one expresses positive beliefs and affect toward TV commercials, particularly as it helps a user of a product feel connected to it.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer believes there is a relationship between a character on a TV program and a product appearing in the program.

The scale measures the extent to which a viewer believes that the role played by a product in a show (TV, movie, play) was pertinent to the story line.

Nine, five-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person is interested in, cares about, and sympathizes with a character on a television program. Russell and Stern (2006) referred to the scale as parasocial attachment.

The sixteen-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the intensity of the relationship that a viewer has with the characters and setting of a TV program and the extent to which it affects the viewer's self-identity.

The scale measures the the extent to which a person perceives that an advertisement has interfered with his/her processing of the non-advertising content of a medium, e.g., watching a TV program, surfing the web, reading articles in a magazine. Although the construct is theorized to lead to negative affective reactions (irritation) and behavioral responses (avoidance), it is viewed as distinct from them.

This four item, nine-point scale measures a viewer's opinion regarding the use (placement) of branded products within the storyline of TV shows. Although stated with reference to TV shows, slight rephrasing of the items for use in similar entertainment contexts (movies, plays, music videos) can be made easily.

Five Likert-type statements measure the relative degree to which a person focuses on programs when watching television or, instead, pays attention to something else.