You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

television

Five Likert-type statements measure the relative degree to which a person focuses on programs when watching television or, instead, pays attention to something else.

The scale has three, seven-point statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a person wants to see a set of ads. Unlike some other measures of ad interest and involvement, this scale focuses on the ads associated with a specific ad vehicle rather than a person's interest in one particular ad or all ads in general.

A viewer's global evaluation of a television show is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has three, seven-point statements that are intended to measure the extent to which a person was motivated to watch some ads during the commercial break of a certain program. Unlike some other measures of attention, this one focuses on the motivation to watch commercials in general during a certain show rather than one´s attention to a particular ad.

Five, four-point statements are used to measure how frequently a child says he/she talks with his/her mother about things shown on TV.

The extent to which a person believes that there is a need for government regulation of programming (including commercials) aimed at children is measured by nine, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of thirteen, five-point items measuring the frequency with which a person reports watching specific types of programs on television.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that parents should control what their children watch on television. In the studies by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998; Carlson, Laczniak, and Walsh 2001) the scale was responded to by mothers but it appears to be amenable for use with other types of respondents as well.

Nine, four-point statements are used to measure how much a child believes his/her mother controls his/her TV viewing in various specific ways.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that there is a need for an organization, independent of parties involved in marketing products, to control television programming aimed at children. As one of the items indicates, the independent organization is envisioned as being composed of parents, educators, and broadcasters; government is not specifically mentioned.  A separate scale was developed by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998) for that.