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Scale Reviews

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television

The scale measures the degree to which a viewer likes a television program.  The items seem to best fit a situation where the viewer has seen only one episode, such as with a pilot, rather than measuring a person's liking of a program that he/she has watched over an extended period.

The scale measures what time during the week a parent reports typically watching TV with his/her children. The version by Carlson and Grossbart (1988) had an extra dimension intended to capture the importance of coviewing.

The scale is composed of 18 questions that are purported to measure a person's sense of the incidence of crime in the country with particular emphasis on New York City.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person (adult) believes that the television programs aimed at kids are of high quality.

A six-item, five-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of skepticism a person has with commercials shown on television, particularly with the motives of the advertiser.

Four, four-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a positive attitude toward a specific television commercial to which he or she has been exposed. The commercial examined by Prasad and Smith (1994) was for a breakfast cereal aimed at children.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of truth a respondent believes there to be in commercials shown on television. As used by Boush, Friestad, and Rose (1994), the scores on all of the items were reversed, leading to interpretation of the scale as measuring the extent of a person's disbelief in TV advertising.

Eight, five-point items are used to evaluate the executional (nonclaim) portion of an advertisement. The phrases appear to focus on the way a message was presented rather than the strength of its arguments.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a viewer of a television program felt that it was an actual account of some events rather than just a fictitious dramatization.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a viewer of a television program felt that it was germane to him or her on a personal level.