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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

threats

The scale has five, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes there are hardships he/she must overcome that were bought on by an unspecified “external force.”

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The extent to which a person considers some particular object as being weird and creepy is measured with three, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure how much a person worries that some person or thing lessens his/her importance, job, and very existence.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a front-line employee of a business is believed to have treated a person unjustly because the customer's language skills were viewed as poor.

With five items, the scale measures a person’s sensitivity to the threat of illness and the transmission of disease with respect to a variety of specific objects and situations. 

Twelve items measure the degree to which a person considers a wide variety of specific objects and situations to be repugnant, particularly if they are viewed as threatening one’s health.

Four questions and a seven-point response scale are used to measure how much a person believes the side effects of a medicinal drug are serious and threatening.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.