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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

touch

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.  

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a product appears to have been touched and is considered dirty. 

The scale has four, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a consumer believes that particular product has been touched by other people and is unsanitary.  While the items themselves do not explicitly mention food, the scale probably makes most sense when used with a food or beverage product.

Four statements are used to measure how much concern is expressed by a consumer about the possibility that other shoppers may have touched or damaged a particular package of a product he/she is thinking about buying.

Twenty, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how comfortable a person is with touching and being touched by others.   The statements are gender-neutral.  The emphasis is on the importance of physical contact rather than the gender of those who are touching.

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person has a feeling of owning an object without actually having possession of it.  While it might be possible to use the scale when people do have some legitimate legal claim to an object, it was not developed for that purpose but instead was meant for occasions when people do not possess an object but feel as if they do.

A 35-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the clarity of mental images a person is able to evoke. This measures a person's general ability to imagine several types of sensations and is not limited to a particular sense or stimulus. It has been referred to by various names, but most of them include the original creator's name (Betts).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the anticipated strength and power of a tool based on tactile sensations. The tool examined by Luo, Kannan, and Ratchford (2008) was a handheld power tool.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure one of two parts of the Need for Touch (NFT) scale, defined as one's "preference for the extraction and utilization of information obtained through the haptic system" (Peck and Childers 2003b, p. 431). This subscale is intended to capture the more goal-driven dimension of NFT such that, during the pre-purchase process, touch provides information relevant to the purchase decision.