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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

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The scale has four, seven-point items that are intended to measure a consumer's expectation that a set of benefits are characteristic of a particular financial planner.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person is satisfied with the institution where he/she received some formal education.

A multi-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure a consumer's assessment of a specified person's competency and training as a source of information about a particular product. Netemeyer and Bearden (1992) used a five-item scale to measure expertise of a personal source of information (retail employee), and Tripp, Jensen, and Carlson (1994) measured the expertise of celebrity endorsers using a six-item scale. Dellaert and Stremersch (2005) used their version of the scale to measure a person's evaluation his/her expertise in configuring a computer. Adjei, Noble, and Noble (2010) used a set of four items twice, once with respect to one's own experitse and once with respect to others from an online forum.
 

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the service received was performed properly. As used by Andaleeb and Basu (1994), the scale relates to the quality of service received from a car repair establishment.