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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

transactions

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the fulfillment of specified and quantifiable obligations in the short term.

The scale has three, five-point items that measure the extent to which a customer feels safe in his/her transactions with a particular online retailer because of the belief that it has implemented adequate safety measures.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a customer believes his/her best interests are guiding a particular salesperson’s efforts to solve one’s problem.

This scale uses four, nine-point semantic differentials to measure a customer's attitude regarding the fairness of his/her treatment in a purchase transaction compared to what other customers were thought to have received.  The emphasis is on the quality of the deal received relative to what other customers got.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular piece of technology makes it easy to conduct a business activity from home is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The implication is that such transactions were previously only possible in person. Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular piece of technology allows a business activity to be conducted quickly is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

A three-item, six-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's attitude toward the social benefits of complaining after a dissatisfying transaction has occurred.

The scale has six, five-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes that a website has e-commerce skills, particularly in managing online transactions. The scale was called ability (trusting beliefs) by Schlosser, White, and Lloyd (2006).

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a customer's global attitude regarding the quality of an experience, such as the service he/she received from a firm. The items seem to relate to the overall interaction with a business rather than just measuring the customer's reaction to the product.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that using a mobile device for purchases and financial activities (banking, investments) is an efficient use of time compared to other means of doing it.