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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

travel

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s intention to say good things about a resort and encourage friends to go there. It appears the scale is easily adaptable for other places that involve lodging.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure how much a consumer engaged in spending behaviors during a trip such as impulse buying and poor decision-making due to insufficient planning and not sticking to a budget.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

How well a person likes a hotel and wants to stay there is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using four statements with a seven-point response format, the scale measures the likelihood that a customer would travel on a certain airline again in the future.  Wagner, Hennig-Thurau, and Rudolph (2009) called it loyalty intentions. The scale is phrased hypothetically because participants were responding to a fictional scenario.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a customer's belief that it is easy to do business with a company because of the helpfulness of its employees.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a customer believes there are benefits to using a particular service because it makes a certain activity easier to accomplish.

The scale uses seven items to measure a consumer's belief that two particular hotels are similar in various ways. Because the information Biehal and Sheinin (2007) provided to respondents about the hotels was limited, most of the items were phrased hypothetically since the respondents had to speculate about them.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure the expected likelihood that a certain hotel chain has several particular benefits characteristic of a higher quality establishment.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person expresses interests and motivations that indicate he/she is open and interested when processing information and experiences related to other cultures.