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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

trust

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.

Within a particular social network, the degree of concern a person has about following others and the riskiness of doing so is measured with six, seven-point items.

Using eight sentences and a seven-point response format, this scale measures the degree to which a consumer expresses strong trust of, affection toward, and commitment to a particular brand.  Several of the sentences are phrased as if one were describing a relationship with a person. 

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes some entity is honest and not manipulative.  The focus of the measure is commonly a person, but the scale is general enough to be used with other entities such as a company, an ad, or a website. 

The degree to which a person believes a particular retailer could be reliable and depended upon is measured with four, nine-point Likert-type items.

How much a customer trusts that an online retailer is protecting his/her personal information is measured using three, five-point items.

The degree to which a person is apprehensive and distrusting of other people in general is measured with four, seven-point unipolar items.

Six semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer’s attitude about a retailer, with the emphasis on beliefs that could be considered most relevant when comparing online retailers.

A person’s general level of trust across a variety of people and situations is measured with 25, five-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure one’s trust of a particular person or those playing a specific role but rather the tendency to trust others and be optimistic about their intentions.