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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

trust

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s negative attitude regarding large food systems (producers and retailers) and the desire to avoid buying from them.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.

Within a particular social network, the degree of concern a person has about following others and the riskiness of doing so is measured with six, seven-point items.

Using eight sentences and a seven-point response format, this scale measures the degree to which a consumer expresses strong trust of, affection toward, and commitment to a particular brand.  Several of the sentences are phrased as if one were describing a relationship with a person. 

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes some entity is honest and not manipulative.  The focus of the measure is commonly a person, but the scale is general enough to be used with other entities such as a company, an ad, or a website.