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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

trust

A person’s level of trust in the benevolence, integrity, and competence of someone who has sent him/her a product-related message via e-mail is measured with nine, seven-point items.

The level of trust a person has in a third party label on a package and the party sponsoring it that attests to an aspect of the product’s quality is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that advertising is trustworthy and provides truthful information about products is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

The desirability of a brand and likelihood of shopping for it is measured in this scale with five semantic-differentials.

With three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how reliable and believable a consumer believes an online store to be.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the consumer has purchased a particular product from the store.  To make the scale amenable for use with respondents who may not have purchased from the store, the item can be easily edited.

The truthfulness of a salesperson is measured in this scale with four items.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the extent to which a customer questions the motives of a particular business entity because of the belief that it took advantage of him/her.

The scale has three, five-point uni-polar items and measures how important a person believes realism and believability are in evaluating an advertisement's quality.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure how credible and authentic a particular advertisement is believed to be.

A person's opinion about the accuracy and truthfulness of the ads for products that are placed within video games is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game but rather, refer to in-game advertising in general.