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trust

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that companies should noticeably position warning-related information in print ads rather than burying it where it is less likely to be seen. The scale was referred to as responsible advertising by Torres, Sierra, and Heiser (2007).

The six, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale are used to measure the degree to which a person has a tendency to trust other people, particularly the ones already known, until/unless there is reason to do otherwise. Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008) referred to this measure as generalized trust.

This six item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person believes that another person who is providing information and advice is benevolent and honest. As used by Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008), the other person was a financial adviser.

The scale has six, five-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes that a website has e-commerce skills, particularly in managing online transactions. The scale was called ability (trusting beliefs) by Schlosser, White, and Lloyd (2006).

Four, ten-point semantic differentials are used to assess the degree to which a customer believes a business is reliable and capable.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a business has the customer's best interest at heart.

The scale has three, seven-point statements that measure the extent to which one states being able to depend on something. The object of trust appears like it can be a person, brand, or organization. In the case of Thomson (2006), trust was related to a "human brand" such as a celebrity.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that government agencies and officials are benevolent and honest with respect to the way a specified activity is regulated. Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008) referred to this measure as system trust-government.

Five, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that a business has professional standards that guide its activities and which the person likes.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement contains price information that is not correct and, in fact, the retailer is intentionally trying to deceive consumers.