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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

trust

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the degree to which those who are in charge of a particular business know what they are doing and are good at it.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a customer's enduring desire to continue a relationship with a retailer as well as the willingness to sustain the relationship over time.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of cognitive effort a person says is needed to process the price information in an advertisement, with the emphasis on determining its accuracy.

The Likert-type scale measures the extent to which an owner/user of a brand describes it's relationship with him/her as being dependable and trustworthy. The scale was called partner quality/satisfaction by Breivik and Thorbjørnsen (2008) but since quality and satisfaction are much broader constructs than is captured by these items, a more specific name was given to it here.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the degree to which those who are in charge of a particular business are sincerely concerned about a customer's welfare.

A person's beliefs regarding the degree to which a particular online business protects customer information is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale is composed of nine-point Likert-type items intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a brand will continue to deliver what it has promised. The scale was referred to as brand credibility by Erdem, Swait, and Valenzuela (2006).

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements that attempt to assess a person's attitude toward a company with an emphasis on the degree to which the company is considered trustworthy.

A person's belief that a particular vendor is dependable and trustworthy is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type statements. The scale was used by Harris and Goode (2004) with online stores but it appears to be appropriate for use a variety of vendors that provide both goods and services.

The degree to which a customer expresses confidence in the dependability and quality of a company/brand is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items . Aaker, Fournier, and Brasel (2004) referred to the scale as partner quality.