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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

typical

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes that an object is original and uncommon. 

The scale measures how common a person believes it is in a certain setting for people to behave in ways that are unfriendly.  The scale was made for use in a situation where customers interact with service employees.  However, the items appear like they could be used with minimal changes in many other contexts as long as people are interacting with others using verbal and non-verbal means to express unfriendliness.  Items for both an eleven-item and a seven-item version are described. 

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes a particular product part is an integral feature of a product.  To be clear, the scale measures how much a component is considered to be a defining feature of the product rather than how important the component is to a consumer’s decision.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular place is unique in the sense that it has distinctive characteristics not found in other places it might be compared to.

How integral a particular product part is viewed as being to a product is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure how important a component is to a consumer’s decision but rather how much a component is considered to be a defining feature of the object.

The scale uses four, nine-point unipolar items to measure a person's belief that a certain brand is ordinary and typical rather than being characterized as a leader or innovative brand.

The degree to which a person believes that a certain brand-related marketing strategy is commonly used among competitors in a certain product category is measured with five, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with a variety of brand-related strategies.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages. 

Three, five-point uni-polar items are used to measure which of two ads a person has been exposed to is viewed as more boring.

The extent to which a person believes that something is uncommon and distinct is measured in this scale with four, uni-polar items along with a seven-point Likert-type response format.  The scale is general in the sense that the items are amenable for use in a wide variety of situations when participants are given the proper instructions.