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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

uncertainty

How difficult a person thinks it would be to make a particular choice is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert items.

The importance a person places on instructions and procedures to guide his/her expectations, particularly in a work context, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree of anxiety and worry felt primarily because of the unpredictable events in one’s environment. (While this scale is not measuring stress due to the changing status of the natural environment per se, its perceived degradation could be one of the causes of overall stress along with other external stressors.)

The degree to which an object or event is considered to be consistent and stable at one extreme or erratic and risky at the other is measured with ten, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

The four, seven-point items in the scale measure how much a person anticipates before making a product choice that he/she will feel personally responsible and unhappy if a poor option is selected.  More specifically, the items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute. 

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is unsure about how a company’s stock will perform.

How much one’s uncertainty about something is determined to some degree by randomness is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that something in the future which is currently uncertain can be more accurately predicted with enough information.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she will feel unhappy and powerless if there is a failure to experience what was expected with regard to a product choice decision.  The items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute.   

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how difficult a person believes it would be for him/her to make a particular choice.