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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

uncertainty

How much one’s uncertainty about something is determined to some degree by randomness is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that something in the future which is currently uncertain can be more accurately predicted with enough information.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she will feel unhappy and powerless if there is a failure to experience what was expected with regard to a product choice decision.  The items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute.   

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how difficult a person believes it would be for him/her to make a particular choice.

The clarity with which a person understands what a particular company does with the data it has on its customers is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.

Using three, seven-point items, this scale measures how much a person feels uncertain about a choice he/she has made.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that everyone could experience a house fire and, if it occurs, smoke detectors can reduce the damage.

The six item, seven-point scale measures the degree to which a person experiences feelings of anticipation such as excitement (at one extreme) or apprehension (at the other extreme) with regard to an upcoming event or activity.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s enjoyment of trying unfamiliar experiences. Although three of the statements are general and do not indicate what is being experienced, two items mention products.

The degree to which a person is apprehensive and distrusting of other people in general is measured with four, seven-point unipolar items.