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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

unique

How much a person feels that he/she is different from other people is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person views him/herself as self-reliant and unique.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how novel and special a person believes the design of something to be.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears to be easily adaptable for use with other objects as well, e.g., a house, a pool, a museum.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes that an object is original and uncommon. 

The degree to which a person thinks that an object, such as a product, expresses his/her personal uniqueness is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes an object or experience is different from others he/she has had.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.