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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

unique

The degree to which a person thinks that an object, such as a product, expresses his/her personal uniqueness is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes an object or experience is different from others he/she has had.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular place is unique in the sense that it has distinctive characteristics not found in other places it might be compared to.

A person’s desire to be distinct from others and to do things that make one’s self different is measured with three, nine-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how different the design of an object is viewed as being from the norm.

The scale has four Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s belief that choosing unique products to own and use can provide him/her with power and influence over others.