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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

unusual

The extent to which a person considers some particular object as being weird and creepy is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that some particular produce (vegetables and/or fruit) is not normal and has something wrong with it, with an emphasis on how it looks. 

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes that an object is original and uncommon. 

With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

A person’s belief that a particular advertisement is different from others to which he/she knows of is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The statements are general and do not indicate how the ad is different.

How much a person has had a particular experience is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person believes a particular advertisement is atypical and unexpected.

With four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how commonplace and ordinary something seems to be. 

The degree to which a person believes that a certain brand-related marketing strategy is commonly used among competitors in a certain product category is measured with five, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with a variety of brand-related strategies.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages.