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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

usefulness

The scale is composed of three statements that measure how much a person believes an advertisement provides information that is useful in making a brand decision.

The scale is composed of four, simple items with a seven-point Likert-type response format that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that, in general, the advertising in a specific country has value because it helps consumers make purchase decisions.

The degree to which a person expresses openness to use information learned from advertising when making purchase decisions is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type statements.

The scale has three, five-point uni-polar items that measure a person's beliefs regarding the way an advertisement is visually presented with an emphasis on how informative and helpful it is. The study by Burns and Lutz (2006) focused on the types of ad formats used online, e.g., banners, pop-ups, skyscrapers, interstitials. A five-point Likert-type response format was used with the items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure a person's attitude about a website's interactivity with the focus on a dimension having to do with the time required for the site's pages to load.

Four statements are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the helpfulness of information provided at a website. The scale was called information content perceptions by Montoya-Weiss, Voss, and Grewal (2003).

The scale is composed of eight items with a seven-point response format and attempts to measure the perceived interactivity of a website with the focus on the site having content that can be managed and keeps the user's attention.

Six statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular online store she/he recently used is helpful in searching for and purchasing products.

The scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a retail website is easy to use in terms of finding products, getting around, and placing orders. Five, seven-point Likert-type statements compose the measure.

A person's beliefs regarding the ease with which a person can find things at a website and move around in it are measured with four statements. The scale was called navigation structure perceptions by Montoya-Weiss, Voss, and Grewal (2003).