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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

value

The four item, seven-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person wants to make some decisions in such a way as to make someone happy and indicate how much their relationship is valued.

How much a person feels his/her life is important and that he/she is essential to others is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.

The degree to which a consumer not only believes that an object or experience is a good topic of conversation but also desires to talk to others about it is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s belief that the price of a brand is reasonable and a good value is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person has an overall respect of self and feeling of inherent value.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure which of two objects a person considers to be more valuable and preferable to own. 

This three item Likert scale with a seven-point response format measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular in-store shopping technology would add value to the shopping experience.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because participants will not actually have used the technology when responding to the scale but merely have read about it.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.

The rarity and scarcity of an object, such as a product, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that what is received when buying a good or service is greater than what is given up. 

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s judgement of a product’s quality and the enjoyment it would bring.  As written, the implication of some items is that the consumer has not experienced the product yet.  In that sense, the scale measures anticipated value.