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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

value

Three statements with a Likert-type response format are used to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion device, the emphasis being on the belief that the deal results in a monetary savings.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's evaluation of an offer that has been presented to him/her. Given the phrasing of one of the items, the scale is most suited for an offer that has to do with an event or cause which a consumer has been asked to support in some way and has the potential to "make a difference" to someone or something the consumer cares about.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person considers the normal price charged for a particular good, service, or activity make the deal a good value.

Seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the perceived value of a deal involving a certain product offered at a certain price. The product examined in the study by Urbany, Bearden, and Weilbaker (1988) was televisions and a three-item scale was employed. In the study by Grewal, Marmorstein, and Sharma (1996), a four-item version of the scale was used to evaluate a shirt.

Four items are employed to measure the perceived value of a deal given a certain product offered at a certain price. All of the studies employed seven-point response formats except Burton and Lichtenstein (1988; Lichtenstein and Bearden 1989) who used nine-point scales.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having the ability to judge "good deals" across brands and stores, especially when it comes to grocery shopping.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a product is viewed as being priced substantially higher than what was expected. The product examined by Urbany and colleagues (1997) was an apartment.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer's perception of a store's policies that make it more advantageous for people to shop there, such as carrying high-quality products, having convenient parking and hours, and taking credit cards.

Four open-ended questions are used to measure a consumer's beliefs regarding various aspects of a product's price.

Thirteen, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer believes that prices for different brands of the same product vary a lot within grocery stores as well as across stores.