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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

value

A person's overall satisfaction with a relationship he/she has with a certain person, company, or organization is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The phrasing of one of the items makes the scale more appropriate for business relationships rather than personal ones.

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person has a feeling of owning an object without actually having possession of it.  While it might be possible to use the scale when people do have some legitimate legal claim to an object, it was not developed for that purpose but instead was meant for occasions when people do not possess an object but feel as if they do.

Using three statements, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a company has lowered his/her customer status.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the perceived level of savings in the purchase of two particular products if purchased separately. Other information provided to respondents indicated that the items could be purchased together as a bundle for a special price. This scale measures their beliefs that savings would be realized even if the items were purchased separately. Yadav and Monroe (1993) referred to the measure as items' transaction value.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the perceived value of overall savings in the purchase of two particular products as a set at a certain price. Yadav and Monroe (1993) referred to the measure as total transaction value.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the perceived additional value of buying two particular products in a set compared with purchasing them separately. Yadav and Monroe (1993) referred to the measure as bundling transaction value.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a shopper perceives that a store has high prices and low storewide savings.

This scale has four bipolar adjectives with a seven-point response format and is used for measuring the degree to which a consumer perceives a store to have good buys on its products. The scale was referred to by Dickson and MacLachlan (1990) as price/value.

A seven-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure the degree to which one evaluates a stimulus (such as a product) as being relevant and meaningful to one's self.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure a person's perception of the magnitude of the savings indicated in an ad for a category of products that are on sale.