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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

value

The extent to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community expresses a sense of belonging to the forum and relies on it is measured in this scale using four Likert-type items and a five-point format.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

Three statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer views the utility received from two different forms of a product to be greater than the utility of the best single form.

This is a three item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person wants to have a lot of product-related information before making a purchase decision and is willing to expend the requisite effort to gather the desired information.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer has such a high regard for a company that he/she would be willing to pay more for its services than for the same service from other providers.

The scale is composed of four, simple items with a seven-point Likert-type response format that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that, in general, the advertising in a specific country has value because it helps consumers make purchase decisions.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that the goods and services available from a particular vendor are a very good value given the prices charged for them. The scale was used by Harris and Goode (2004) with online stores but it appears to be appropriate for use with brick-and-mortar stores as well.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much value a person places on a specified object or offer.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements attempting to assess a consumer's opinion of the prices charged by a certain store given the perceived quality of the products carried. Baker et al. (2002) referred to the scale as merchandise value perceptions.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer has a positive attitude toward an offer in terms of its economic value.