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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

value

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer eagerly seeks lower than expected prices for products, feels good when they are found, and feels bad when they are not. The scale was called transaction utility by Völckner (2008).

The three, five-point Likert-type items in this scale measure the extent to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community considers his/her membership to be important and wants to maintain the relationship.

The extent to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community expresses a sense of belonging to the forum and relies on it is measured in this scale using four Likert-type items and a five-point format.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a member of a virtual peer-to-peer problem solving (P3) community believes that the information received from other members of the community is a valuable resource.

Three statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer views the utility received from two different forms of a product to be greater than the utility of the best single form.

This is a three item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person wants to have a lot of product-related information before making a purchase decision and is willing to expend the requisite effort to gather the desired information.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer has such a high regard for a company that he/she would be willing to pay more for its services than for the same service from other providers.

The scale is composed of four, simple items with a seven-point Likert-type response format that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that, in general, the advertising in a specific country has value because it helps consumers make purchase decisions.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that the goods and services available from a particular vendor are a very good value given the prices charged for them. The scale was used by Harris and Goode (2004) with online stores but it appears to be appropriate for use with brick-and-mortar stores as well.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much value a person places on a specified object or offer.