You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

value

The scale is composed of semantic differentials that measure a consumer's evaluation of a product. Depending upon the mix of items used, the scale measures some aspects of purchase intention and/or product quality.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point statements that measure the degree to which a person has a positive opinion of a business' loyalty program and is likely to recommend it to others.

Five, seven-point statements are used to measure a person's attitude regarding the sale of an object in his/her possession. The scale makes the most sense to use when the focal object potentially has some symbolic and/or emotional value to the respondent. McGraw, Tetlock, and Kristel (2003) called the scale predicted stress because the items (as shown below) were stated hypothetically. If desired, the sale could be easily adapted to become a more direct measure if the items are stated in the present tense, e.g., "I reject the idea as completely inappropriate."

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that advertising has value and is important. The items are general enough so that they can refer advertising in general or to advertising in a specific medium. The scale was not, however, developed for use with a specific ad.

The scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives that a product is a good value for the money given that one knows its price. The measure was referred to as perceived value indicators by Dodds, Monroe, and Grewal (1991).

The scale is composed of six statements measuring the utility resulting from the perceived quality and anticipated performance of a particular brand. One way the scale is distinguished from that of a satisfaction scale is that it could be applied at various stages during the purchase decision process whereas satisfaction is usually measured after the decision.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the utility derived from the perceived ability of a particular product to enhance its user's self-concept and social approval.

Six Likert-type statements are used to measure a consumer's opinion of how good a deal is for a certain product at a certain price. The emphasis of several items is that the price is lower than expected given one's knowledge of what is being charged elsewhere.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the pleasure one feels in getting a good deal. The items suggest that not only is the person glad to be saving money but that a positive emotional reaction is felt. Further, the items assume the respondent has been exposed to some particular deal and is reacting to it as well as giving a sense of his/her enjoyment in getting similar deals.

Five statements are used to measure the utility resulting from the affective reaction to a particular product. One way the scale is distinguished from that of a satisfaction scale is that it could be applied at various stages during the purchase decision process whereas satisfaction is usually measured after the decision.