You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

values

This five-item, seven-point Likert-type attitude scale measures the importance a person generally places on being able to express who he/she is and that it is one of his/her highest values.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person has high standards when making choices in life and does not settle for anything less than the best.

A person’s trait-like tendency to prefer middle choices as a goal in decision-making strategy is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The importance a person places on instructions and procedures to guide his/her expectations, particularly in a work context, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The degree to which a person feels virtuous and having high standards at a certain point in time is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The extent of similarity a person believes there to be between him/herself and someone else in terms of cognitive and physical characteristics is measured with four, seven-point items.    

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular task he/she engaged in strengthened what was personally important in life. 

This scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that people can make a new beginning with hope of a better life, despite his/her past or present circumstances.

The belief that there are opportunities for anyone to make economic progress and be successful through hard work is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Seven Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she is treated fairly, in general, and receives what is deserved.