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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

values

The degree to which a person is more nature-centered in his/her system of values, as opposed to human-centered, is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using ten items and a five-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person is faithful to a set of religious beliefs and practices in daily life.

How much a person values caring for the environment and believes in making environmentally responsible decisions is measured with four, seven-point questions.

The four, seven-point unipolar items are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with self-direction and stimulation.

Four, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with power and achievement.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with social and environmental concerns.

How much a person values security for self and family is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes in the inequality between those people with more power and those people with less.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The scale measures the degree to which a person either believes that people should give priority to what is best for the group or, at the other extreme, that individual goals and needs are more important than those of the group.  Six, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The acceptable level of power disparity among people in a society is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure a person's power nor the power inequality of a culture per se but rather a person's attitude about power disparity.