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The scale measures a consumer’s belief in personal reincarnation and that the universe itself is in a continual cycle.

This scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person's preference for certainty and tendency to feel anxious when outcomes are uncertain.

The degree to which a person prefers to act independently rather than as a member of a group, with a strong sense of freedom, autonomy, and personal achievement is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that males are generally characterized by greater physical strength and ambition than females is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person accepts differences in the power wielded by various members in a social group.

This scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the extent to which a person values one's culture, traditions, and family heritage.

The scale measures the degree to which a person holds beliefs consistent with a form of Christianity referred to as Evangelical.  The scale is composed of nine, nine-point Likert-type items.  Those scoring high on the scale would, for example, believe that their salvation is based on their acceptance of Jesus Christ as their savior rather than earning it with their own effort.

With three, six-point Likert-type items, this scale is intended to measure a person's beliefs regarding the malleability of traits and attributes related to things in the world (self, others, and the environment).  At one extreme, some believe that the world is uncontrollable and fixed while at the other extreme there are people who view people and things as changeable and adaptive.

The extent to which a person identifies with people around the world is measured in this scale using nine, seven point statements.

The degree to which a person views fate as a powerful force that influences events and outcomes is measured in this scale using six, ten-point Likert-type items.  Fate has a sense of predestination while luck is more transient.  Despite the distinction, the scale seems to capture aspects of both.